Hurricane Season Fast Facts

Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurrican...

Posted: May 7, 2018 4:53 PM
Updated: May 7, 2018 4:53 PM

Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30.

Facts:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration defines a hurricane as "an intense tropical weather system with well-defined circulation and sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher." In the western Pacific Ocean, hurricanes are called typhoons while similar storms in the Indian Ocean are called cyclones.

The peak of the Atlantic season is from mid-August to late October.

Hurricanes are rated according to intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The 1-5 scale estimates potential property damage.

A Category 3 or higher is considered a major hurricane.

A hurricane watch indicates the possibility that a region could experience hurricane conditions within 48 hours.

A hurricane warning indicates that tropical-storm-force winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 36 hours.

Hurricane Development:
There are four stages of development: tropical disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm, tropical cyclone (hurricane).

Tropical disturbance: Cloud columns develop into a cluster of thunderstorms.

Tropical depression: Thunderstorms intensify, with maximum sustained winds of 38 mph.

Tropical storm: Maximum sustained winds are between 39-73 mph. During this time, the storm becomes more circular in shape, with winds swirling around a calm center, known as the eye. This is when the storm is named.

Tropical cyclone (hurricane): Wind speeds reach 74 mph. The storm is at least 50,000 feet high and 125 miles across, rotating around an eye that spans 5-30 miles wide.

Hurricane categories:
Category 1: Minimal hurricane
Winds 74-95 mph.

Storm surge 3-5 feet.

No significant damage to buildings. Damage primarily to unanchored homes, shrubbery and trees.

Some damage to poorly constructed signs and coastal road flooding with minor pier damage.

Damage to power lines and poles could result in power outages lasting several days.

Category 2: Moderate hurricane
Winds 96-110 mph.

Storm surge 6-8 feet.

Some damage to buildings, mainly roofs, doors and windows. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Major damage to mobile homes. Extensive damage to poorly constructed signs and considerable damage to piers.

Small craft in unprotected anchorages may break moorings.

Power outages could last from several days to weeks.

Category 3: Extensive hurricane
Winds 111-130 mph.

Storm surge 9-12 feet.

Some structural damage to small buildings. Many large trees blown down. Rampant destruction of mobile homes in storms ranked category 3 or higher. Serious coastal flooding, damaging or destroying structures along the water.

Evacuation of low-lying residences within several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Electricity and water may be unavailable for several days to a few weeks.

Category 4: Extreme hurricane
Winds 131-155 mph.

Storm surge 13-18 feet.

Extensive building damage to windows and doors as well as roof collapse in some small residences. Shrubs, trees and signs are blown down. Major damage to lower floors of buildings near coastline due to flooding, battering waves and floating debris. Major beach erosion.

Power outages could last from weeks to possibly months. Areas may be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Category 5: Catastrophic hurricane
Winds greater than 155 mph.

Storm surge higher than 18 feet.

Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Widespread destruction of structures less than 15 feet above sea level within 500 yards of shore. Low-lying evacuation routes cut off by rising water 3 to 5 hours before hurricane center arrives.

Advance evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles of the shoreline may be required.

Power outages could last for months. Area may remain uninhabitable for months.

Names:
There are ten regional lists of names worldwide: Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, Central North Pacific, Western North Pacific/South China Sea, Australian Region, Nadi, Port Moresby, Jakarta, Southwest Indian Ocean and Northern Indian Ocean.

Using women's names for Atlantic storms was the practice until 1979, when male names were added to the mix.

The World Meteorological Organization's Hurricane Committee creates lists of hurricane names that are recycled every six years.

Names associated with storms that have caused significant death and/or damage are retired from the list. After an active 2017 hurricane season, NOAA announced the names Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate were being retired. Other names that have been removed include Camille (1969), Andrew (1992), Opal (1995), Floyd (1999), Ivan (2004), Katrina (2005), Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012). Once a name is removed, another name replaces it.

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

(Widget updates once daily at 8 p.m. ET)

Confirmed Cases: 33558

Reported Deaths: 2110
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Marion9616571
Lake3538185
Cass15897
Allen145168
St. Joseph124834
Elkhart116328
Hendricks116171
Hamilton115693
Johnson1093108
Madison58559
Porter51627
Bartholomew50034
Clark49241
LaPorte42423
Howard39526
Tippecanoe3903
Jackson3791
Delaware37736
Shelby36822
Hancock32728
Floyd31839
Boone30935
Morgan27824
Vanderburgh2652
Montgomery23517
White2318
Decatur22431
Clinton2231
Noble21121
Grant20621
Harrison19221
Dubois1923
Henry16910
Greene16824
Monroe16612
Warrick16628
Dearborn16621
Vigo1648
Lawrence15423
Miami1411
Putnam1367
Jennings1304
Orange12522
Scott1193
Kosciusko1111
Franklin1098
Ripley1086
Carroll922
Marshall901
Daviess8516
Steuben812
Newton7710
Wayne776
Fayette767
Wabash762
LaGrange712
Jasper651
Washington521
Jay500
Fulton481
Clay471
Rush462
Randolph463
Pulaski460
Jefferson431
Whitley393
Starke363
Sullivan341
Owen341
Brown331
DeKalb331
Perry310
Benton300
Knox290
Wells280
Huntington272
Tipton251
Crawford240
Blackford242
Fountain202
Switzerland200
Spencer191
Parke170
Posey160
Gibson142
Adams131
Ohio130
Warren121
Martin110
Vermillion100
Union80
Pike60
Unassigned0164

Illinois Coronavirus Cases

(Widget updates once daily at 7 p.m. CT)

Confirmed Cases: 117455

Reported Deaths: 5270
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Cook762663570
Lake8063287
DuPage7543362
Kane6188170
Will5442269
Winnebago215654
McHenry151471
St. Clair109179
Kankakee87144
Kendall76919
Rock Island64624
Champaign6177
Madison56558
Boone42817
DeKalb3924
Sangamon34629
Jackson26810
Randolph2674
McLean21713
Peoria2128
Ogle2023
Stephenson1992
Macon19519
Clinton18117
Union1519
LaSalle14713
Whiteside13512
Iroquois1314
Coles12514
Unassigned1250
Out of IL1191
Warren1130
Jefferson10116
Knox970
Grundy952
Monroe9411
McDonough878
Lee791
Cass710
Tazewell714
Henry680
Williamson642
Pulaski510
Marion500
Jasper457
Macoupin452
Adams441
Perry420
Montgomery391
Vermilion391
Morgan351
Christian334
Jo Daviess320
Livingston322
Douglas260
Menard210
Fayette203
Ford201
Jersey201
Woodford192
Mason180
Washington180
Mercer170
Hancock160
Shelby161
Bureau151
Carroll142
Bond121
Franklin120
Piatt120
Schuyler120
Clark110
Crawford110
Fulton110
Moultrie110
Brown100
Cumberland100
Logan100
Wayne91
Alexander80
Henderson80
Effingham71
Johnson70
Massac70
Saline70
Greene50
Marshall50
De Witt40
Lawrence40
Richland30
Stark30
Clay20
Edwards20
Gallatin20
Hamilton20
Wabash20
White20
Calhoun10
Edgar10
Hardin10
Pike10
Pope10
Putnam10
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A wonderful Saturday with sunshine expected!
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