Terre Haute son gives father gift of life

The gift of life is something parents give their children by default. In turn, they teach their kids to live it to the fullest, but Tim Wilson had no clue his 9-year-old would give him the best gift possible.

Posted: Dec. 7, 2017 4:32 PM
Updated: Dec. 7, 2017 6:36 PM

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) - The gift of life is something parents give their children by default. In turn, they teach their kids to live it to the fullest, but Tim Wilson had no clue his 9-year-old would give him the best gift possible.

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Maddox Wilson is a very good little league baseball player. His father Tim, is his coach,

"He's a lot better than I was at that age," Tim Wilson said.

But Maddox has been stepping up the plate in more ways than one.

"It's been a couple of times where it's been really close. If he wouldn't have been there, I wouldn't be here now talking to you," Tim Wilson said.

Tim is a type 1 diabetic. That means it's genetic. It's an issue he's battled for 23 years. He generally has it under control, but as most diabetics would tell you, he's had some major scares. Maddox Wilson described the first one he saw his father have.

"I was actually scared because I didn't know what was wrong with him at first, then I figured he had diabetes and his sugar was really low," Maddox Wilson said.

Tim's blood sugar had gotten to dangerously low levels. Maddox was only 7 at the time. Eventually, paramedics were called and Tim recovered, but Maddox used the scary situation as an opportunity to learn.

"They (paramedics) taught me how to give him shots and how to check his sugar," Maddox explained. He didn't know he'd need that training several times in the future.

Tim said his insurance had changed his medication. He believes that caused him problems, leading more health scares. Each time, however, Maddox was there helping to keep his father alive.

"At first, it tore me up. It wasn't a good feeling. I felt it was a burden, you know? I'm his father. I should be taking care of him, you know? He shouldn't be having to do these things for me," but soon Tim Wilson realized the blessing he had right in front of him.

"For a 9-year-old to put as much interest in it as he does, to stay calm, the entire time, it's amazing," Tim said.

Things are better now. Tim's medication is different, and there have not been any scares recently. Still, Tim calls his son a guardian angel.

Meanwhile, Maddox Wilson is grateful as well. He's kept his eyes on the prize, both on and off the field.

Tim Wilson says his 9-year-old is the greatest prize possible.

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